Technology Connections. Podcasting for Librarians

Have you heard of podcasting? Do you happen to be familiar with this very popular method of auditory entertainment that started back in 2004? In this column, we are going to explore some exciting podcasts in the area of librarianship, as well as some podcasts for your students to enjoy.

If you are unsure what a podcast is, think of it as a radio broadcast, but one you can listen to at your own convenience, on your computer or favorite device. There are so many podcasts to choose from on a variety of topics. Popular ones include Serial, This American Life, Startalk, and for kids, The Past and the Curious.

Library Podcasts

Circulating Ideas: https://circulatingideas.com/

Circulating Ideas features “conversations with innovative people and ideas allowing libraries to thrive in the 21st century.” Steve Thomas, who created this particular broadcast, interviews librarians from around the world who share their ideas, thoughts, and narratives. With an easy-to-search platform, Circulating Ideas lets you freely scroll through the interviews to listen to the wealth of knowledge our peer librarians have to share.

Beyond the Stacks: http://beyondthestacks.info/

Wondering what you can do with that library degree? Beyond the Stacks can help you discover unexpected ways to put your MLIS degree to use through its interviews with librarians and information science professionals. There is even an interview with a meme librarian!

Librarians Assemble!: http://www.librariansassemble.com/

For something a little bit different, take a listen to Librarians Assemble! Do you enjoy being a librarian? Do you enjoy comics? Then this is the podcast for you. Hosted by Josh Stone, each episode of Librarians Assemble! includes book recommendations and program ideas and introduces passionate librarians who promote comics in libraries.

Podcasts for Our Students

Stuff you Missed in History Class: http://www.missedinhistory.com/

This particular podcast is part of the How Stuff Works family of podcasts. It delves into stories and additional historical background not commonly revealed in history textbooks. A great enhancer to any history, science, or language arts lesson, it’s just one of many podcast series that might catch your students’ interest.

Listenwise: https://listenwise.com/

This amazing tool brought to us by NPR offers short podcasts in the areas of language arts, science, social studies, and current events. Students listen to podcasts and then you, as an instructor, can use content that Listenwise has already created to have them answer questions about the information, engage in discussions, and much more. An easy-to-use site that focuses on listening comprehension skills for middle and high school students.

Tumble: http://www.sciencepodcastforkids.com/

Tumble is “a science podcast for kids, to be enjoyed by the entire family.” The hosts invite scientists from various fields to help tell stories about scientific discoveries and processes. A very approachable podcast that can be fun for a class, small group, or individual.

Create Your Own Podcasts

Spreaker: https://www.spreaker.com/

Students in our libraries write, create, record, and use video and more. Have you ever had them podcast? It is just another way to tell a story. Spreaker is an easy-to-use tool for creating podcasts that also allows you to add in effects and more Students will love having their own podcasts to include on library webpages and social media sites. Perfect for grades 6-12, use Spreaker for your next round of booktalks or maker interviews.

At almost fourteen years old, podcasts are not a new technology, but no matter the age, they provide some wonderful resources in the field of librarianship. Although my list barely scratches the surface on kid-friendly podcasts, hopefully this introduction can help get you started or re-inspired. I hope this article entices you to try podcasting. If you are a fan already, recommend some great broadcasts to a peer. Sharing excellent resources is what makes this professional learning network of ours so amazing!

About the Author

Heather Moorefield-Lang, EdD, is an associate professor for the Department of Library and Information Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. To see more of Heather's work visit her website at www.techfifteen.com, email her at hmoorefield@gmail.com, or follow her on Twitter @actinginthelib.

MLA Citation Moorefield-Lang, Heather . "Technology Connections. Podcasting for Librarians." School Library Connection, January 2018, schoollibraryconnection.com/Home/Display/2247705.

View all citation styles

Entry ID: 2133838

Back to Top